Impressions, Old Town Waterfront

Impressions, Old Town Waterfront
Impressions, Old Town Waterfront. Nikon D810, Nikon 200mm f/4 AI, ISO 64, f/8, 6 sec.

Lights from the dock, restaurants, and boats shimmer in the waters of the Potomac River.  An exposure time of six seconds allows them to blur and become colorful patterns against the deep blue of the twilight sky reflected in the water.

West Marine, South Patrick Street

west-marine-south-patrick-street
West Marine, South Patrick Street. Nikon D200, 35mm f/1.8 AF-S DX, ISO 250, f/4, 1/20 sec.

I love photographing architecture and this building, while not a particularly interesting specimen, took on a beautiful glow at dusk. Twilight exterior photographs can really make almost any building look glamorous.

I happened to have my camera sitting on the front seat of my car (it goes with me almost everywhere) and I snapped this photo while sitting in line at a red light.

MGM National Harbor, from Alexandria Waterfront

mgm-national-harbor-from-alexandria-waterfront
MGM National Harbor, from Alexandria Waterfront. Nikon D200, Nikkor 200mm f/4 AI, ISO 100, f/8, 1/2 sec.

As some of you know, I’ve been studying and shooting architectural photos a lot this past 8 months or so. It’s been a while since I’ve been down to the Old Town waterfront, so when I was there last night walking around, I was surprised to see that the MGM is looking to be nearing completion (at least from the exterior).

I happened to have my 200mm f/4 in my pocket (try doing that with any other 200mm lens), so I put it on my camera and propped the whole thing on a pier piling using my wallet under the lens to get the angle just right. Blue hour makes for gorgeous architectural photos, assuming you wait until the ambient light mixes with the man-made light. It’s quickly becoming one of my favorite times to photograph!

Window in Alcove, South Pitt Street

Window in Alcove, South Pitt Street
Window in Alcove, South Pitt Street. Nikon D200, 35mm 1.8 AF-S DX, ISO 400, f/4, 1/60 sec.

Photographers refer to the hour after the sun goes down as blue hour. It’s a magical time to be out shooting, as you can really play with the juxtaposition of cool and warm light.

I spent some time photographing this particular scene with different compositions, fascinated with the way the warmth from the man-made light receded into the cool blue of twilight. In the end, I decided I liked this composition where I omitted the actual source of the warm light, making it appear as if the window is being bathed in light from an otherworldly source.